Focusing

How should the concentration of a professional athlete look? That’s what you can find out in this article.

Focus is all about prioritization. At any given time of the day, you might have 10 different things on your mind. You might be thinking about getting an oil change, whether this Thursday or next Thursday is pay day, what you’ll make for dinner, whether you should change your facebook profile picture, what to get your wife for her birthday later this month, or whether or not you should ask your boss for a long overdue promotion. As an athlete, when you enter the arena, your mind should immediately begin the process of prioritizing. When you walk through the dressing room doors, nothing else matters but the task at hand.

Once you step onto the playground, your focus must narrow even more. Everything becomes about the moment. The past is gone. Even what you let enter your focus window becomes crucial. The human brain can only efficiently focus on two stimuli at a time. The first priority has to be what your senses are telling your body about what is happening on the playground. The second focus priority is the communication from your team mates, helping you to make sound, split-second decisions.

Once you start letting other stimuli into that focus window, you start to lose efficiency and the potential for error increases dramatically. If you add in a screaming coach or parent, or you let taunts from opponents into your range of focus, you will experience significant drop offs in your prioritized focus areas and essentially, your overall focus. Being able to block out these other aspects is what is known as the focus control. This ability is crucial for a good performance of any athlete.

It’s important to have control of over your concentration. Contact our team of mental coaches to learn this ability [and much more].